Sunday, September 7, 2008

EAYLF 2008 - Third Day (continued)

Prince Damrong Rajanupab is the Father of Thai's History. He was s son of King Mongkut (Rama IV) and the brother of King Chulalongkorn (Rama V). His residence, Varadis Palace, is a lasting memorial to his life and achievements.


( click to enlarge)

If you guys took history, the names of his father and brother should be familiar.

The palace and adjacent library offer a fascinating insight into one of the most memorable members of the Chakri dynasty, a man who daily mixed with civil-service, head of state and foreign dignitaries, yet who, at home with his family, lived a simple life. Prince Rajanupab was no doubt one of the most important people in Thai history.

Continuing from where I had left..

Before proceeding to touring the palace, we had to gather in the prince's private museum, to hear a briefing.


Hikari slept during the briefing. Couldn't blame him.

Yes, briefings are boring, I know. They always do. But there's something different about this briefing. Although it still retains the same boredom you always hear in every briefing session, the guy who briefed on us caught everyone's attention. Take this, he is the grandson of Prince Rajanupab! I had actually met a descendant of King Mongkut! This is something that will be etch in my memory forever!


I think he's called Sangkadis Diskul.

He is so humble! He kept on asking us to forgive his bad English. Honestly, he speaks good English! I like this guy. You don't always see modesty in other people who are like him!




Ben (Cambodian) presenting a gift to him on behalf of the delegates

Much to everyone's relief, the briefing didn't take quite long. We were then guided around the museum by an officer.



The museum stores the prince's extensive collective of books and personal writings. Apart from his initiatives and archaeology, these books are his most valuable legacy to the Thai nation.



That was the very table Prince Rajanupab, together with his father and brother used to work on. I'm not sure if we were allowed to touch the precious things there though!


The chariot.

After the museum tour, we went straight to the palace. The tour in the palace was somewhat scary. The palace interior reminds me of a typical Asian haunted house.





The tour guide seems so scary too! She sends a chill up to my spine! It's not entirely about her looks. It's the way she speaks! Before anything else, she warned everyone, "You should all follow where I go. No one is to wander anywhere,in this palace..alone..If you wander alone,then..Muahahaha" Ok, I'm exagerating :P But yea, it was something like that (of course the "Muahaha" wasn't there).




She guided us thoroughly, never missing a thing. When we got on the first floor, I solved the mystery. The tour guide showed us the exact spot where Prince Damrong died. She told us that on that very floor lies the ashes of Prince Damrong, together with his ancestors. No wonder the place looks so haunted! No wonder wandering alone in the palace isn't a good idea. Imagine getting lost in this palace at night! *shivers*

As the tour reached its end, the tour guide suddenly sat down and muttered a silent prayer to the place where they kept all the ashes. Having nothing better to do, everyone followed suit. Some prayed, some just stared at empty space. As she finished her prayer, she thanked us rather silently, and then walked down the stairs to the ground floor. We followed her, only to find out that she suddenly disappeared!! I'm serious! She sorts of vaporised into thin air! That was so freaky!

I'm glad this spookiness is forgotten once we went outside. There was this group of girl students performing a Thai version of the chicken dance.



Not very appealing though. But it sure lightens our mood with all the laughters they had caused.



And then, there's this:



They are making some sort of bowls. With the help of a handle, these bowls produces sound.



I don't know how to describe the sound. It sorts of produces a vibrational sound. Imagine knocking the bowl with the handle. The bowl seems too vibrate, right? Now imagine the sound it produces. Then imagine using your hand to make the sound waves move harmoniously, in circle. That's the sound it produces. Ok, shoot, I know you guys don't get me :P Never mind.

After that, it was time to part. The officers of this palace bid us farewell, and thanked us.


My bad, she didn't disappeared entirely after all :p

Then, we head back to the hotel.

To be continued..

___________________________________________________________________
:: Posted by DENCORPORATION at 8:09 PM |

Comments: Post a Comment


<< Home
TAGBOARD




DENCORPORATION

Photobucket

Blog shared between Desmond, Edison and Nazrin. Edison is no longer a sleeping partner. What D.E.N. stands for is self-explanatory.




PLEASE VISIT

  • East Asian Youth


    BLOG LINKS

  • Alon Hong
  • Amaluddin
  • Amelia
  • Andy & Jestina
  • Andy Teo
  • Anna & Eileen
  • Arifuddin
  • Azizi
  • Azmi
  • Bazilah and Friends
  • Benedict
  • Calvin
  • Carmen
  • Chea Hong
  • Cheah Wen
  • Chen Chen
  • Cody, Eric & Bokhari
  • Dawn Lim Deekinder Denise
  • Elena
  • Farhan
  • Farhana
  • Faridah
  • Hanis
  • Hisyam
  • Huzaishysy
  • Jaqy
  • Jimbo
  • Judy Goh
  • Karen
  • Kai Ping
  • Kimmy
  • KLH Society
  • Kwang
  • Lee Lu
  • Lin Siew
  • Lu See
  • Lu Yee
  • Marlene
  • Masrini
  • Melissa Tan
  • Nabilah
  • Najaah
  • Princess @ Ryu
  • Qiqah
  • Queen @ Wani
  • Renzo
  • Shair Li
  • SKY's Happy-Stop (阿勇)
  • Vern
  • Wee @ Awiyah
  • Winnie
  • Xin Ping
  • Yap
  • Yen Chuan
  • Yush
  • Yusof
  • Zatty
  • ZulHF


    BLOG ARCHIVE

  • March 2007
  • April 2007
  • May 2007
  • June 2007
  • July 2007
  • August 2007
  • September 2007
  • October 2007
  • November 2007
  • December 2007
  • January 2008
  • February 2008
  • March 2008
  • April 2008
  • May 2008
  • June 2008
  • July 2008
  • August 2008
  • September 2008
  • October 2008
  • November 2008
  • December 2008
  • January 2009
  • February 2009
  • March 2009
  • April 2009
  • May 2009
  • June 2009
  • July 2009
  • August 2009
  • September 2009
  • October 2009
  • November 2009
  • December 2009
  • January 2010
  • February 2010
  • March 2010
  • April 2010
  • May 2010
  • June 2010
  • July 2010
  • September 2010